Military Science and Leadership

Military Science and Leadership Minor - 17 Hours

Students may earn a minor in military science and leadership by successfully completing:
MSL 323  Leadership and Problem Solving (3)
MSL 324  Leadership and Ethics (3)
MSL 325  Leadership and Management (3)
MSL 326  Officership (3)
Three (3) additional hours of an approved course in military history

Military Science Courses

Aerospace Studies Classes

AES110 The Foundation of the United States Air Force. 2 hours. Introduces the Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Topics include professional appearance, military customs and courtesies, core values, equal opportunity and treatment, officer opportunities, group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES120 The Foundation of the United States Air Force. 2 hours. Continues the introduction to the Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Topics include Air Force origins, organizations, major commands, installations, sister services (Army and Navy), group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES210 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power. 2 hours. A survey course designed to facilitate the transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC officer candidate. Explores Air Force heritage, Air Force leaders and Air Power doctrine. Applies communicative skills. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES220 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power. 2 hours. Continues the transition from cadet to officer candidate. Expands leadership topics through the use of group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES310 Air Force Leadership Studies. 3 hours. An integrated leadership and management survey course emphasizing development of the individual as an Air Force leader. Special topics include situational leadership, principle-centered leadership, corrective supervision and counseling. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES320 Air Force Leadership Studies. 3 hours. Ethical decision making, personal core values, and character development are discussed. Military evaluation systems are outlined. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES410 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty. 3 hours. Examines the national security process, regional studies, Air Force and joint doctrine. Special topics include the military as a profession, and civilian control of the military. Continued emphasis on communicative skills. Leadership lab. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

AES420 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty. 3 hours. Examines civilian control of the military, officership, the military justice system, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Continued refinement of communicative skills. Leadership laboratory. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Air Force. Offered on UMC campus.

Military Science and Leadership

MSL110 Foundations of Officership. 1 hour.Introduces students to issues and competencies that are  central to a commissioned officer's responsibilities. Establish framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values followed and "life skills" such as physical  fitness and time management. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL111 Introductory Military Science Laboratory I. 1 hour.Field application of skills taught in MSL110, to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and  basic soldier skills. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL110.

MSL112 Basic Leadership. 1 hour. Establishes foundation of basic leadership fundamentals such as problem solving, communication, briefings and effective writing, goal setting, techniques for improving listening and  speaking skills and an introduction to counseling. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL113 Introductory Military Science Laboratory II. 1 hour.Field application of skills taught in MSL112, to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and basic soldier skills. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with US Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL112.

MSL220 Individual Leadership Studies. 2 hours.Students identify successful leadership characteristics through observation of others and self through experimental learning exercises. Students record observed traits (good and bad) in a dimensional leadership journal and discuss observations in small group settings. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL221 Intermediate Military Science Laboratory I. 1 hour.Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as squad-level offensive and defensive operations. First aid topics and drill and ceremony are also  taught. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL220.

MSL222 Leadership and Teamwork. 2 hours.Student examines how to successful teams, various methods for influencing action, effective communication in selling and achieving goals, the importance of timing the decision, creativity in the problem-solving process, and obtaining team buy-in through immediate feedback. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL223 Intermediate Military Science Laboratory II. 1 hour.Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as platoon-level offensive and defensive operations. Practical application of night land navigation. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL222.

MSL323 Leadership and Problem Solving. 3 hours.Students conduct self-assessment of leadership style, develop personal fitness regimen, and learn to plan and conduct individual/small unit tactical training while testing reasoning and problem-solving techniques. Students receive direct feedback on leadership abilities. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL324 Leadership and Ethics. 3 hours. Examines the role communications, values, and ethics play in effective leadership. Topics include ethical decision-making, considerations of others, spirituality in the military, and survey Army leadership doctrine. Emphasis on improving oral  and written communication ability. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL323.

MSL325 Leadership and Management. 3 hours. Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and mentoring subordinates. Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling  techniques. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus. Prerequisite: MSL324.

MSL326 Officership. 3 hours. Study includes case study analysis of military law and practical exercises on establishing on ethical command climate, service as an officer; capstone exercise. Leadership lab Students must complete a semester-long Senior Leadership Project that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate,  analyze, and demonstrate their leadership skills.   Prerequisite: MIL325. Note: Course is part of cross-town agreement with U.S. Army. Offered on UMC campus.

MSL327 Advanced Transition to Lieutenant I. 3 hours. Independent research, analysis, and monthly discussion on related military topics. Personal, academic, and professional goals and objectives; development and maintenance of an officer evaluation report support form. Prerequisites: MSL110, MSL220, MSL323,and MSL325; or Department Head's permission. Fall.

MSL328 Advanced Transition to Lieutenant II. 3 hours. Independent research, analysis, and monthly discussion on related military topics. Personal, academic, and professional goals and objectives; development and maintenance of an officer evaluation report support form. Prerequisites: MSL110, MSL220, MSL323,and MSL325; or Department Head's permission. Fall.

MSL333 U.S. Military History in the Western Tradition. 3 hrs. Analysis of United States military history from the Colonial period to the present (1609-2012). A comprehensive look into the evolution of warfare in America, military traditions, heritage, and technology in the American Revolution, War of 1812, Mexican-American War, Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, World War I, Inter-war period, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, Afghanistan, and Iraq. This course cannot substitute for required credit in history. It is part of the minor in Military Science and Leadership.

The Aerospace Studies Program

Central Methodist University has a cooperative arrangement with the U.S. Air Force which allows students to en-roll in Air Force ROTC courses offered at the University of Missouri-Columbia, while attending CMU on a full-time basis. This program allows students to qualify for a commission as a second lieutenant by the end of their Senior year. Classroom instruction is provided one day a week in conjunction with the leadership lab at the University of Missouri. Students are expected to maintain a grade point average of at least 2.5 to remain in the Air Force ROTC program. Various three-year and two-year scholarships are available for CMU students.

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) offers a number of opportunities for CMU students who wish to become commissioned officers in the U.S. Air Force. Job availability on completion of a degree includes pilot, navigator, security forces, intelligence officer, non-rated operations, and technical and non-technical positions of responsibility. Opportunities in the Air Force also are excellent for students in health related and legal professions. Jobs are available in over 30 non-technical career fields requiring backgrounds in personnel management, business, accounting, political science, criminal justice, as well as numerous other academic majors.

To enroll in the General Military Course (GMC), or Basic Course, students in the four-year program must register for Aerospace AS 110 (fall) or 120 (spring): The Foundation of the United States Air Force (2). Students in the three-year program may enroll concurrently in the Freshman and Sophomore classes, Aerospace Studies 110/120 and 210/220: The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (2).

Students usually attend summer field training prior to their Junior year, before elevation into the Professional Officer Course (POC). Entrance into the POC, which is the last two years of AFROTC studies, is based on an extensive evaluation and selection process during the student's Sophomore year. Non-scholarship students are not obligated to military service until their Junior year.

Members of the POC receive an allowance of $450-$500 per month regardless of scholarship status. Cadets who complete the POC in good standing and earn degrees are commissioned as second lieutenants and serve on active duty for four or more years depending on their selected Air Force career.

Upon graduation and commissioning as an officer in the Air Force, students fulfill their military obligation by agreeing to retain their commission for four years active duty. Pilots incur a ten-year active duty commitment after completing undergraduate pilot training. Navigators incur an eight-year active duty commitment after completion of undergraduate navigator training.

For more information, contact Detachment 440, University of Missouri, at 573-882-7621.

Army Reserve and National Guard

Army ROTC students belonging to Army Reserve or Army National Guard units are eligible for other benefits including the G.I. Bill, drill pay, and full tuition. These students can generally opt to stay with their unit after graduation or request an active Army assignment. Re-serve and National Guard officers attend one weekend drill per month and an annual two-week training period. In addition to the pay and benefits awarded, Reserve and National Guard officers are free to pursue a full-time civilian career.

Qualifications

All students who desire to enter Army ROTC must be United States citizens, be in good physical condition, and have high moral character. Students must be at least 17 years old to enroll and not more than 31 when they receive their commission. To be eligible for a scholarship, students must maintain a grade point average of 2.5, pass an Army medical examination, and pass an Army Physical Fitness Test.

In addition to their academic and military training, Army ROTC students may participate in a variety of extracurricular activities including sports, adventure training, social events and community service.

Program Requirements

The curriculum consists of classroom instruction and a weekly laboratory in which students receive leadership experience. The courses in military science and leadership are both academic and hands-on. Most count toward the student's degree requirements.

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps academic program consists of:

  • A degree in the student's chosen academic subject
  • 12 to 22 credits in the Military Science and Lead-ership curriculum
  • An approved course in American military history

Students who earn a Bachelor's degree and a commission as a second lieutenant will serve as a platoon leader in one of several career fields including combat arms, engineering, signal operations, military intelligence, military police, logistics, and finance. For information, contact CMU's ROTC coordinator at ROTC@centralmethodist.edu.